Census shows language changes in the West Island

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Francophones down while allophones increase

BY ELYSE AMEND

elyse.amend@transcontinental.ca

The latest census data released Tuesday shows francophones are making up less of both Canada and Quebec’s populations while allophones have increased, and the numbers show most of the West Island is following suit.

From Baie d’Urfé’s total population of 3,890 in 2006, anglophones makes up 60.8 per cent of the population, which is 17.7 per cent higher than the last census in 2001. Francophones now account for 19.7 per cent of Baie d’Urfé’s population, a 20.3 per cent drop compared to five years ago. Just over 15 per cent of Baie d’Urfé residents speak a language other than English or French as their mother tongue.

In Senneville, which has a population of 950, the number of allophones has remained the same at 7.9 per cent. Francophones, however, have dropped 20.7 to make up 36.3 per cent of the population, while the number of anglophones has gone up 17.8 per cent to reach 55.8 per cent of the population.

In Dollard des Ormeaux, there has been a drop in both anglophone and francophone residents in the past five years, while the allophone population has risen. Of 48,690 residents, 35.2 per cent speak a language other than English or French as their mother tongue, a 13.1 per cent rise since 2001. Just under 45 per cent speak English as their mother tongue, which is a 0.4 per cent drop. Francophones have also gone down by 11.3 per cent, now accounting for 16.6 per cent of the population.

There are now more allophones in Dorval as well: of 17,880 residents, 21.9 per cent speak neither English nor French as their mother tongue, 34 per cent more than in 2001. English-speakers make up 45.2 per cent of the population – a 2.9 per cent rise – while French-speakers are down 11.2 per cent at 30.2 per cent of the population.

Changes from 2001 to 2006 in Kirkland are not as large, but both francophones and allophones are down slightly. Of 20,465 residents, 28.6 per cent are allophones, a 3.5 per cent change. Francophones make up 23.7 per cent of the population, 4.2 per cent fewer than five years ago. Anglophones have gone up seven per cent to reach 44.9 per cent of the population.

Pointe Claire has also seen a rise in its allophone population since 2001. Of 29,880 residents, 19.9 per cent have neither official language as their mother tongue, a 24.5 per cent increase. Anglophones account for 55 per cent of the population, which is down slightly by 0.2 per cent, while francophones make up 22.4 per cent of residents, also down by 4.2 per cent.

Ste. Anne de Bellevue remains the West Island’s only francophone city, with 43.5 per cent of the 4,765 residents speaking French as their mother tongue, which is up 0.7 per cent since 2001. The anglophone population, however, has gone up by 10.7 per cent to reach 38.0 per cent. Allophones now account for 15.4 per cent of the population, which is also up by 10.5 per cent.

In Beaconsfield, however, the number of mother tongue-English residents has dropped slightly, while the number of francophones has gone up. Of the 19,065 population, 53.3 per cent speak English as their mother tongue, a 4.2 per cent drop. Francophones have gone up 2.8 per cent, accounting for 26.9 per cent of the population. Allophones make up 17.7 per cent of Beaconsfield residents.

Statistics on the boroughs of Pierrefonds-Roxboro and Ile Bizard/Ste. Genevieve were not immediately available, as they are included in the City of Montreal’s numbers.

Geographic location: West Island, Canada, Quebec Senneville Dorval Beaconsfield Kirkland Pointe Claire Ile Bizard Montreal

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